Serology Testing
 

This is a blood test. It is designed to detect antibodies (immunoglobulins, IgG and IgM) against the coronavirus that causes the disease called COVID-19. Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection and are specific to that particular infection. They are found in the liquid part of blood specimens, which is called serum or plasma, depending on the presence of clotting factors. IgM and IgG may either be ordered together or separately.

Having an antibody test is helpful if:

  • your health care provider believes you may have been exposed to the coronavirus which causes COVID19 based on your current or previous signs and symptoms (e.g., fever, cough, difficulty breathing);

  • you live in or have recently traveled to a place where transmission of COVID-19 is known to occur;

  • you have been in close contact with an individual suspected of or confirmed to have COVID-19; or

  • you have recovered from COVID-19.

(Antibody IGG / IGM)
Screenshot 2020-06-28 at 10.43.04 PM.png

Serology, Antibody Testing: 

Antibody Testing

  •  Easy operation for Doctors and Professionals

  •  No special equipment storage and transportation conditions required

  •  Works with whole blood, serum, and plasma

  •  Tests for 2 antibodies IgM and IgG simultaneously

  •  Instant Field screening

  •  97 %+ACCURACY

Is Test Specific to Covid-19?

The IgG that the test detects is specific to COVID-19, so a positive result would indicate COVID-19 infection. Although the IgM is a more generalised antibody, its presence, combined with IgG and/or the common symptoms of COVID-19, would also indicate infection with the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus. The test can be used for primary and secondary diagnosis of COVID-19.
What is IGG & IGM?

Immunoglobulins are antibodies themselves and are part of our immune system. When we get an infection, such as COVID-19, immunoglobulins are produced, which attach to the virus and activate the rest of the immune system to attack and clear the virus. IgM is the first immunoglobulin to be produced and is a general antibody that can bind to many different types of pathogen. The presence of IgM is an indicator of early infection. IgG is a more specialised antibody that specifically binds to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The presence of IgG is an indicator of later stage infection (usually 7 days or longer after infection).

What do the results Mean?

The test strip has three different lines; one for IgG, one for IgM and one control line. There are four different valid results:

IgM + Control - The sample is positive for IgM. This means the patient is in the early stages of an infection and combined with the common symptoms, is positive for COVID-19

IgG + IgM + Control - The sample is positive for both IgG and IgM and therefore positive for COVID-19

Control only - The sample is negative

If the control line does not appear, the test is void and should be repeated, irrespective of how many test lines are visible.

What if I Test Positive?

In this case, there are two options. Either you are infected and may begin to display symptoms in the next few days, or you are infected but are asymptomatic (you won’t display symptoms). In both cases, you should treat it as though you are positive for the virus and should follow the appropriate healthcare guidelines. Speak to your healthcare practitioner for further advice.  The likely next step will be a PCR test for

confirmation.  And treatment per direction of your Healthcare Practitioner and or Healthcare Government Agency. 

Can test detect asymptomatic patients?

Yes, the test will be able to detect IgM/IgG in asymptomatic people, as they will have an immune response even though they don’t display symptoms. The timeline of infection will be the same as someone displaying symptoms.

What if I test Negative but have Symptoms?

If you have the common symptoms of COVID-19 (fever and cough), you likely have contracted the infection and should self-isolate. It is likely your IgG/IgM levels haven’t risen to a detectable level yet. You can be tested again 24 hours later for confirmation id required. Speak to your healthcare practitioner for further advice.